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Author Topic: Iron Age. Not over yet?  (Read 32071 times)
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Kuuga
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« Reply #48 on: March 29, 2005, 05:33:19 AM »

Quote from: "Super Monkey"
Nah, We are way past the Iron Age and well into the Dark Age of comics.


You may be right.  DC Comics. Where Legends Die.
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« Reply #49 on: March 29, 2005, 11:50:07 AM »

Quote from: "ShinDangaioh"
Yes, they did the antholgy route once before: Blue Ribbon Digest.  I have no idea why they stopped it.


Ah yes, the Blue Ribbon Digests!  Where I learned huge hunks of my DC lore --and it all began with the horrible Teen Titans digest, with Carmine Infantino aping my then-hero George Perez to ill effect.  I love the Silver Age and Flash and Nova Infantino (and his Golden Age Black Canary is awesome!) but he was no George Perez.  But that volume got me started and I still pick the digests when I see them.

To be fair, I mildly enjoyed both Sea Guy and New Frontier from DC this year (although I read loaned copies :oops: ).  And of course, the Bizarro volumes are great!

The best superhero comic book of the last 5 years is Goody Good Comics # 1.
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« Reply #50 on: April 09, 2005, 12:20:07 PM »

One of my favourite mainstream superhero comics of the last few years was World's Funnest Comics by Evan Dorkin and a host of great cartoonists --the book starred Mr. Mxylptlk and Bat-Mite running rampabt throught the DC multiverse --with plenty of commentary on the crappy nature of new DC comics.  Dorkin also writes for kids TV and comedy and puts out a hilarious comic called Dork!

Dorkin's latest post on his blog about the new DC Crisis-type miniseries is spot on the money about why DC/Warner comics are horrible.

**Warning: strong language!**

http://www.livejournal.com/users/evandorkin/55351.html?thread=1099063#t1099063
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« Reply #51 on: April 10, 2005, 06:12:58 AM »

Iron age over? I guess that remains to be seen, for Superman, at least.

There are two additions to the Superman mythos during the Iron Age that are worth keeping, though (and Gangbuster is not one of them, despite my username.) First, there is Steel. John Henry Irons, the man worthy to become Superman...clearly his character was inspired by the introduction to Lowther's 1942 novel. And then there is Bibbo, a bum who wins the lotto and uses the money to help people out, inspired by Superman.

I think Superman is improving. While the Death storyline wasn't great in the comics, the novel version is. We have Birthright, and the Superman/Batman comic written by Loeb, who knows Superman. There is a new Kara Zor-El Supergirl series coming this summer, Bizarro  #1 is back with hilarious comic collections, (Bizarro Comics and Bizarro World) and Krypto is going to be used more, now that he has his own cartoon show.

Then again, Byrne is returning to Action Comics. But as long as you're careful about which comics you buy, all is well. Can't say the same about the DC Universe as a whole. Will the upcoming Crisis 2 restore the DCU, or will it reboot more characters? Not sure, but I'm reading it anyway until I find out.  I don't remember a Rann/Thanagar war ever happening before.
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« Reply #52 on: April 16, 2005, 06:38:14 AM »

Quote from: "dto"
Quote from: "Kuuga"

Then you have the mainline. Or as I like to call it "Earth-D" for death.


Kuuga, that's slanderous!   Poor Earth-D, home of the multi-ethnic Justice Alliance of America was NOTHING like the present mainstream DCU.  :wink:  

The end of Earth-D was chronicled long after the Crisis in "Legends of the DC Universe: Crisis on Infinite Earths" (February 1999), written by Marv Wolfman.  Chronologically, this episode should be between "Crisis on Infinite Earths" #4 and #5.  A summary of this relatively hard-to-find issue is at http://www.io.com/~woodward/chroma/cr4_5.html

A good list of alternate Earths can be found at http://www.io.com/~woodward/chroma/atlas.html.  The current DCU is labeled "Earth-0", as in post Zero Hour.  I'm sure we can also associate the "Zero" with other attributes...   :wink:


Well the list of earths is incomplete. Here is a list of the post-Crisis earths based on information from spark...@mindspring.com (Steve Parker) from Usenet:

Earth-Sigma: The very short lived merged earth that existed Crisis #11 & 12, the few tie up loose end issues after Crisis, and the Legion of SuperHeroes until about 1989. If Superman or the LSH remembers Kara El dying fighting the Anti-Monitor, Lady Quark comes from another reality rather than another planet, or people who are stated as dying during Crisis are alive at the end of issue #12 or issue immedately after then you are dealing with Earth-Sigma.


Earth-AC (Earth After-Crisis): Superman and a Kryptonian artifact called
the Eradicator are the last survivors of Krypton which was a bleak sterile
place. The Flash is Wally West and taps into something called the Speed Force and there are dozens of other speedsters (including the original Flash with the Mercury-like bowl on his head) Guy Gardner is running round with Sinestro's ring and Hal had a fake Green Lantern ring he was tricked into taking from some guy named Lord Malvolio (Action #632-#635) which may or may have not called him to go nuts and kill the GLC. The Justice Society originally never had Superman, Batman or Wonder Woman as members. Anytime Hawkman or the Legion of Superheroes is mentioned, people get headaches.

Earth-ZH (Earth Zero Hour): The stillborn earth related on the back of Zero Hour #0. Is there supposed to be only one timeline but Armageddon 2001 (which required alternate timelines to work) and the Supergirl of the Time Trapper's artificial alternate timeline still exist/happened? Is the current Hawkman a Native American? Does the LSA now have Wonder Woman's time traveling mother as a member? Do many time travel stories now make no sense what so ever? Welcome to Earth-ZH.

Earth-Hypertime (1999-current): Is Kingdom Come and every other Elsewords part of the DU multiverse? Do the Superman titles have absolutely no continuity with each other or the rest of the DCU? Does Superman have both Matrix and a cousin called Kara-Zor-El who both answer to the name Supergirl? Does trying to make sense of about any character's history give you headaches? Welcome to the current mess known as Earth-Hypertime. And we warned you this would happen.
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« Reply #53 on: April 16, 2005, 03:47:26 PM »

The AGES of Comics from  Mike's Amazing World of DC :

The Golden Age (1935-1947): An era dominated by super-hero anthology titles and World War II. Unofficially begins with the first DC comic New Fun Comics #1 (2/35). Officially begins with Action Comics #1 (6/38) - The 1st appearance of Superman. Ends with the gradual phase out of the super-hero beginning with the cancellation of All-Flash (12/47). End also coincides with the cancellation of DC's first title More Fun Comics (11/47).

The Atom Age (1948-1955): An era in which the dominance of the super-hero declined. DC launched new titles from a variety of genres. Era begins with the first DC crime comic Gang Busters #1 (12/47) and first western, Western Comics #1 (1/48). Other genres represented include: romance with Girls' Love Stories #1 (8/49), science-fiction with Strange Adventures #1 (8/50), and war with Our Army at War #1 (8/52). Era ends with the reemergence of the super-hero, beginning with Flash in Showcase #4 (9/56).

The Silver Age (1956-1965): An era in which the super-hero returned to prominance. Era officially begins with the reintroduction of the Flash in Showcase #4 (9/56). Other key events include the revivals of: Green Lantern in Showcase #22 (9/59), Hawkman in Brave and the Bold #34 (2/61), the Atom in Showcase #34 (9/61), and the introduction of the Justice League in Brave and the Bold #28 (2/60). Era continues into the Late Silver Age.

The Late Silver Age (1965-1970): Continuation of the Silver Age. Late period has fewer revivals and is marked by increase experimentation with many short-lived titles. Period begins with start of the Teen Titans title (1/66). Other key events include the start of the Go-Go checks (2/66), Joe Orlando's role as creative director, and the price increase from 12 to 15. Era officially ends with Jack Kirby's return to DC (10/70).

The Early Bronze Age (1970-1975): Era noted for Jack Kirby's return to DC, beginning with Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #133 (9/70). Kirby titles dominate DC's new titles including: Forever People (2/71), New Gods (2/71), Mr. Miracle (3/71), Demon (8/72), Kamandi (10/72), Boy Commandos (9/73), Black Magic (10/73), Sandman (Win/74), and Omac (9/74). Other key events include: Batman's return to darkness beginning with Detective Comics #395 (1/70), the introduction of Ra's Al Ghul in Batman #232 (6/71), and the Adams/O'Neil "relevance" period in Green Lantern beginning with #76 (4/70). Early period officially ends with the last 100-Page Super Spectacular (3/75). Era continues in the Bronze Age.

The Bronze Age (1975-1978): Continuation of the Early Bronze Age. This period is categorized by the introduction of many short-lived titles and "family" giants. Period officially begins with the conversion from 100-Page to 68-page giants (4/75) and the launch of many new titles: Secrets of Haunted House, Beowulf, First Issue Special, and Richard Dragon Kung Fu Fighter (all 4/75); plus Tales of Ghost Castle, Joker, Tor, Claw the Unconquered, Justice, Inc., and DC Special's return (all 5/75). Era officially ends with the DC Implosion (11/78).

The Early Iron Age (1979-1986): Period characterized by DC's recovery from the DC Implosion (11/78) and birth of the direct market. Key events include: the first DC mini-series World of Krypton (7/79), the first digest Best of DC Digest (9/79), the first direct market titles Madame Xanadu (81) and Camelot 3000 (12/82), the Wolfman/Perez Teen Titans (11/80), Moore's Swamp Thing (1/84) & Watchmen (9/86), Crisis on Infinite Earths (4/85), and Miller's Dark Knight (86). Early period officially ends with Earth-1 Superman continuity in Action #583 (9/86). Era continues in the Iron Age.

The Iron Age (1986-1988): Era continues from the Early Iron Age. This period characterized by the relaunching of key DC characters beginning with Man of Steel #1 (10/86). Other relauches include Wonder Woman (2/87), the Justice League (5/87), and Flash (6/87). Period ends with the death of Robin in Batman #428 (12/88). Era continues in the Late Iron Age.

The Late Iron Age (1989-1991): Era continues from the Iron Age. Late period begins with the launch of Sandman #1 (1/89) which gives birth to a line of titles that become Vertigo. Other key events include the revamping of Hawkman in Hawkworld (89) and Green Lantern in Emerald Dawn (12/89). Era ends with Armageddon 2001 (5/91).

The Early Dark Age (1991-1992): Era categorized by the birth and overuse of cover variants and gimmicks. Begins with Armageddon 2001 #1 (5/91). Other key events include "Silver Ink" printings of Armageddon annuals (5/91-10/91), holograms on the Robin II mini-series (12/91), the gem cover on Eclipso:The Darkness Within #1 (7/92), and multiple covers/stories on Team Titans #1 (9/92). Era continues into the Dark Age.

The Dark Age (1992-1994): Era continues from the Early Dark Age. Era defined by the darkening of the super-hero, the replacement of DC's flagship characters, and the dominance of the anti-hero. Begins with Batman:Sword of Azrael #1 (10/92). Other key events include: the Death of Superman in Superman #75 (1/93), Batman being replaced by Azrael during Knightfall, and the murder of the Green Lantern Corps by Hal Jordan in Green Lantern #48-50. Era continues into the Late Dark Age.
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« Reply #54 on: April 16, 2005, 05:31:18 PM »

My usual label re: Ages consist of:

Golden Age: (1938-1951) Starts with the first issue of Action Comics in '38, and ending with the cancellation of "All Star Comics" (the last appearance of the JSA).

Interim period/"post-Golden Age" (1951-1956): not sure what else to call this period ("in flux" as this site calls it might work, too). Basically the comics that fall between the JSA's cancellation and the start of the Silver Age proper (see below); stuff like the EC horror comics would fit in this era.

Silver Age: (1956-c. 1970) Starts with "Showcase" #4 and the Flash, ends circa 1970 for various factors: Kirby moving to DC from Marvel, Mort Weisinger retiring, and the Green Lantern/Green Arrow miniseries.

Bronze Age: (c. 1970 - 1986) Starts with the Silver Age elements listed above (or the Superman makeover of the early 70's), and ends with "Crisis On Infinite Earths" in '85-'86.

Modern Age: (1986 - present) Starts with Superman's reboot / "The Dark Knight Returns", and still ongoing today. Suppose if one wants to split it into "early" and "current" eras, the dividing line for that might be the current JLA comic's debut (or whenever the current "Silver Age-redux" nostalgia trend started).
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« Reply #55 on: April 24, 2005, 02:10:53 AM »

Quote from: "Johnny Nevada"
My usual label re: Ages consist of:

Golden Age: (1938-1951)

Interim period/"post-Golden Age" (1951-1956)

Silver Age: (1956-c. 1970)

Bronze Age: (c. 1970 - 1986)

Modern Age: (1986 - present


It personally think that one must realize that ages fade into each other. Even in Greek mythology it is implied that the Golden age slowly gave way to the Siver and so so forth. The Bronze Age origianlly came from the modern horror comic revival what started in the mid to late 1960's and went on until fading in the late 1970's early 1980's. Some comic fan argue that the Silver age didn't really kick off until Fantastic Four #1 in 1961. My own ages are as follows:

Gold 1938 - c1948 (Action #1 to a greater public interest in Western Books) In 1948 the public seem to shift its interest from Superhero books to Westerns. By 1951 the number of Superheroes (both characters and books) had dropped substantially effectively ending the Golden Age.
 
 _Seduction of the Innocent_ (1954)
 
Silver 1956/1961 (Showcase #4/Fantastic Four) - c1970

Bronze ('Modern' Horror stories) c1965 - c1982
 Didn't really effect Superhero books until c1970 when comics stared to
 deal with more serious subjects
 (Green Lantern/Green Arrow #76 ; SpiderMan #95-96)

'Our' Modern (Iron) Age 1984-present

Yes there are gaps but we have since found out that comic books go back as far as The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck in 1837 so the traditional ages don't really fit anyhow. Comic books as a mass media item show up in 1897 with The Yellow Kid in McFadden's Flats so there are ages *before* Golden but what to call them has been a little on the fuzzy side.
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