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Author Topic: Castro vs Superman  (Read 8646 times)
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TELLE
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« on: February 07, 2006, 09:09:32 AM »

Funny stuff about Elian Gonzalez (now 12 years old) in a CBS article.  A big deal in the US news a few years ago.  Canadians were puzzled.

Here is an excerpt:

"Che Guevara was yesterday, Elian Gonzalez is today. And that’s precisely how Cuba is playing him. In what’s called the Museum of Ideas in Cardenas, he has already been cast in bronze as the revolutionary hero preparing to throw Superman — in Cuba a symbol of imperialism — onto the rubbish pile of history. "

Outside of banana republic dictators, are there any overt references to Castro's Cuba in the comics?

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/09/28/60minutes/main888950.shtml
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celacanto
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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2006, 11:31:07 AM »

I always remember one of the first Flash II sagas. with flash in Cuba helping Castro to defeat a Durlan invasion  :lol:  :lol:
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Super Monkey
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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2006, 04:44:32 PM »

Silly Commies...
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« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2006, 03:08:50 AM »

Superman? A symbol of "Imperialism"?!  :shock:

IIRC, the original Superman-Red, Superman-Blue story mentions Castro dismantling his weapons (the "anti-evil ray"'s effects)...
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NotSuper
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« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2006, 04:15:31 AM »

I fail to see how ANYONE could see Supermnan as a symbol for imperialism. Heck, the guy fought against corrupt politicians, businessmen, and munitions makers in the Golden Age. That doesn't scream "imperialism" to me. Then again, it would be crazy for me to think that the majority of people in Cuba had actually read any Superman stories--I just wanted to point that out.  Smiley

The real reason they hate him is most likely because he's part of Americana.
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« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2006, 03:40:25 PM »

The problem i think its not with comunism. its with the autoritarian goverments and dictatorship. i wrote in other topic that superman was forbiden in my country for years. And we had a dictatorial goverment ultracatolic, conservative and anticomunist.

Yeah more like its the problem that sometimes supes its seen more as an USA symbol rather than universal.
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JulianPerez
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« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2006, 04:08:31 PM »

In Miami there are a lot of terrible, terrible Cuba jokes circulated by exiles that haven't been to Cuba since the Fifties.

Here's one involving Superman:

    One day, Superman decided to visit Cuba. He noticed, however, that when leaving the island, his flight was incredibly sluggish. Had Castro slipped him some Kryptonite while he was in the country? That's when he noticed why: lots of Cubans were holding on to his cape.[/list]

    Quote from: "celacanto"
    Yeah more like its the problem that sometimes supes its seen more as an USA symbol rather than universal.


    Who remembers that RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE album cover, "the Evil Empire" with a picture of a slightly sinister Superman?

    Latin Americans, especially Latin American intellectuals, often consider a product of American pop culture as being imperialist in message - if not directly, than in subtext, and this is not a trait exclusive to Superman. The book HOW TO READ DONALD DUCK provides a Latin American perspective on exported American pop culture, particularly on Disney comics.

    This attitude is changing, as many young people growing up in Latin America take pop culture seriously, and do not consider it "trash" culture or disposable. Elan Stavans, author of THE RIDDLE OF CANTINFLAS and the comic book A LATINO HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES shows, featuring Superman and Captain America besides masked wrestlers and the Mexican Calavera figure.

    Incidentally, I lived in Little Havana in walking distance from the Gonzalez relatives during the protests. My God, was that ever a surreal scene. One Dad was walking his kid around on his shoulders - a kid that was a lookalike ringer for Elian himself. Little notecard protest sandwich boards were hung on either side of dalmatian weiner dogs. By far the weirdest part of the whole scene was Donato Dalrymple, the fisherman that saved the boy and the Kato Kaelin "comedy relief" of this entire affair, coming by and absorbing adulation from all the elderly Cuban grandmothers.
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    « Reply #7 on: February 09, 2006, 01:14:25 AM »

    Quote from: "JulianPerez"


    Latin Americans, especially Latin American intellectuals, often consider a product of American pop culture as being imperialist in message - if not directly, than in subtext, and this is not a trait exclusive to Superman. The book HOW TO READ DONALD DUCK provides a Latin American perspective on exported American pop culture, particularly on Disney comics.


    I'm from Latin America, and I can say that it's so very true, unfortunatly. Back in college, a teacher of International Relations on Post-War showed in his class images of what he considered exemples of American Imperialism, and there was a scene of Christopher Reeve as Superman from the movie, with the USA flag. I didn't start a fight in the class, but really wanted to.
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