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Author Topic: Superman in the Silver Age  (Read 112977 times)
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Rugal 3:16
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« Reply #40 on: November 03, 2003, 12:21:30 PM »

some questions.. do you have to pay to be a member of the GCD?? I envy all those covers you can post here..

Do you guys have ANY info about the contents of the various available Superman Digests?? (same size as those of archie)

any help would be nice.
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Aldous
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« Reply #41 on: November 21, 2003, 07:17:30 AM »

Quote
India Ink:

By the way, reading the review of "The Super-Prisoner of Amazon Island," on the old DCMB, I noticed that Aldous never quite got to the conclusion of this story, and now it's bothering me--just how did it all turn out in the end?

To refresh our memories here's the review by Aldous from that thread:


Quote
Aldous:

Do you have the sexy story from Action #235 (1957)? "The Super-Prisoner of Amazon Island."

Wayne Boring and Stan Kaye, artists.

This may be an example of what you're talking about. This story is another favourite of mine. The amazons in the story are all very leggy, shapely and sexy. Wayne gave Lois a nice figure (I guess), but still managed to make her homely and dull-looking (the short hair doesn't help).

I'll run through the story for anyone who's never seen it.

Lois and a group of women become marooned on an uncharted island.

..........

But now he is shocked to find the Kryptonite weakens him, and realises with horror that the Queen's crown contained some rare substance that neutralised the Kryptonite.


Did I ever reply to this? I don't think I did.

The story actually did end right there, although there was a one-panel denouement I didn't mention. After the adventure, Lois and Clark are back at the Daily Planet office and Lois is pensive.

Lois: "Superman failed in my task and I could have married him! Was I a fool to let him go, Clark?"

Clark: "Er... Perhaps you were, Lois!" Clark thinks: "...Luckily for me!"
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Aldous
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« Reply #42 on: November 21, 2003, 07:28:10 AM »

I mentioned this on another thread just the other day, but so many of the greatest Superman stories begin with, "One day in the offices of the Daily Planet..."

Writing of the conclusion to the Amazon story reminded me that they often end in the offices of the Daily Planet as well. In this way they are so like a TV series, like, for instance, Star Trek. (There are plenty of other examples.) Each new adventure begins with Jim Kirk and Spock on the bridge, on just another routine day, when something out of the ordinary kicks off the episode. Then, at the conclusion of the episode, the status quo is restored: there they are, back on the bridge, as they were. Nothing about the characters or their personal situation has changed... and they are ready for the next adventure to begin.

Many of my favourite Superman stories are like this.
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Osgood Peabody
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« Reply #43 on: November 22, 2003, 04:20:19 AM »

Hi - thought I'd drop in - haven't visited in a while.

Apropos to this thread, I just finished an interesting story entitled "The Super-Menace of Metropolis", by Binder, Boring & Kaye from Superman #134, Jan. 1960.  I don't believe I've ever come across it before, and it's one of those early SA stories from Binder that seems to consolidate elements previously introduced in the past year and a half - sort of a "stepping-stone" if you will.  I find these types of stories fascinating in retrospect, as we see elements like the Fortress, the Kryptonian heritage, and Supergirl begin to emerge in a new light.

But perhaps the biggest milestone in this tale is the name "Kandor" is first uttered, at the start of part 2 of this full-length story.  Going back through all of the earlier appearances of the bottled city, many which are viewable now on the web, it is referred to as the Krypton city, or the city from Krypton, etc.  In fact, in World's Finest 100, "the Dictator of Krypton City" (Mar. 1959), its citizens are even referred to by Luthor as "Kryptonites"!?!

When I have some more time, I'd like to review this story in more detail as it's quite a doozy.
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Aldous
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« Reply #44 on: November 25, 2003, 09:13:22 AM »

Hi, Osgood.

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Apropos to this thread, I just finished an interesting story entitled "The Super-Menace of Metropolis", by Binder, Boring & Kaye from Superman #134, Jan. 1960.


I take it you mean Otto Binder...?

Quote
But perhaps the biggest milestone in this tale is the name "Kandor" is first uttered, at the start of part 2 of this full-length story. Going back through all of the earlier appearances of the bottled city, many which are viewable now on the web, it is referred to as the Krypton city, or the city from Krypton, etc.


Are you sure? ...because I thought Otto Binder first named Kandor in the original Brainiac story from Action #242 (1958).

In any case...

Quote
When I have some more time, I'd like to review this story in more detail as it's quite a doozy.


Please do, as I'd be very interested to read your review.
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Osgood Peabody
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« Reply #45 on: November 25, 2003, 02:28:08 PM »

Aldous - I stand corrected - I didn't remember seeing Kandor named in the first story "The Super-Duel in Space" , but I went back and viewed it on this site, and sure enough, there it is on page 10.  Strangely, the name doesn't come up again in the story - even when Superman is tucking it away in his Fortress, he refers to it as the "miniature Krypton city".

In fact, I don't think the name is ever mentioned again until the "Super-Menace" story a year and a half later.  I believe I've read all of the other Kandor stories in between, which are:

"The Shrinking Superman" from Action #245 (Oct. 1958)

"The Dictator of Krypton City" from World's Finest #100 (Mar. 1959)

"The War Between Superman and Jimmy Olsen" from Action #253 (Jun. 1959)

There's also a brief Kandor appearance at the end of "The Lady and the Lion" from Action #243 (Aug. 1958), but I don't have it handy, so I'm not sure if Kandor is named in that story.

It almost seems like they forgot they had given it a name during this time.

Anyway, I hope to get back to "Super-Menace" later this week, and yes, the story is indeed credited to the great Otto Binder.
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Aldous
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« Reply #46 on: November 26, 2003, 07:30:41 AM »

Most peculiar! I think you're onto something, Osgood, as this panel from The Lady and the Lion shows. The Bottle City appears a couple of times in the story, but there is no mention of the name Kandor. This is the very next issue to the one in which Kandor first appeared.

Would there be an editorial reason for not using the name Kandor? Were they hoping to play it down, minimise the significance of the Bottle City? The Bottle City seemed to form an integral part of the plot in The Lady and the Lion, but no Kryptonian citizens are shown, and Superman doesn't enter the city; it's presented almost as an oddity, an "artifact" or a curio. It's not really given a human dimension. Was the Bottle City thought of as a useful plot device and little else? Maybe playing down the name was part of the process of making the city more "impersonal" and presenting it on less familiar terms.

Then again, could it just be, as you say, forgetfulness on the part of the creative team...? Unlikely? Remember Stan Lee writing about Peter Palmer and Bob Banner!
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India Ink
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« Reply #47 on: November 26, 2003, 11:43:58 PM »

I think Weisinger might have realized that, like the Legion, Bizarro, and the many forms of Kryptonite, the bottle city had the potential to be an important element in the expanding Superman mythology.

All of these items were tweaked in their early stages before settling into a definitive version (even the bottle city is a tweak of the ealier Wizard City).

Maybe Weisinger didn't like the name "Kandor" or maybe he realized that the trademark Krypton name should be used to assert ownership of the concept as well as to remind kids, reading about it for the first time, that this city was from Krypton.
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India Ink
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