Superman Through the Ages!Holliston School Committee  
  •   forum   •   THIS WEEK'S CHAPTER: "THE POWER!" •   fortress   •  
Superman Through the Ages! Forum
News: 2024 UPDATE!! Superman Through the Ages! forum is now securely located at https://WWW.SUPERMANTHROUGHTHEAGES.COM/FORUM - your username and password for forum.superman.nu will still work, although your browser won't know them under the new domain name. You can look them up in your browser's saved passwords.  This is the first time we have had an SSL cert, so your credentials and website activity are now secure!  Please bear with us as we update the site to the brand new, super-secure location of www.supermanthroughtheages.com! This may take some time. For more details, please see the forum update.
 
*
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
July 18, 2024, 10:40:21 PM


Login with username, password and session length


Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The Last, Truly Great, Original Super-Hero Ever Created  (Read 22879 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
TELLE
Supermanica Council
Council of Wisdom
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1705



WWW
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2007, 07:33:21 PM »

Some examples of Marvel marketing Wolverine as a superhero

http://www.marvelstore.co.uk/product.aspx?ID=MOBWOL2WALL

http://www.amazon.com/Marvel-Super-Hero-Squad-SaberTooth/dp/B000M2FY8E

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Marvel-Superhero-Showdown-Starter-Wolverine/dp/B0009F4YQM

Logged

Everything you ever wanted to
know about the classic Superman:
Supermanica
The Encyclopedia of Supermanic Biography!
(temporarily offline)
Aldous
Superman Squad
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 843


Downunder


« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2007, 07:43:10 PM »

Super Monkey, you have to let this one go. He's a super-hero, and I haven't seen anything in this thread that takes the subject title away from Logan, except maybe those turtles.

It doesn't make a bit of difference what a website says. (Maybe you get too much info from the internet.) My opinion is my own and it comes from reading the Uncanny X-Men comics when Logan was part of a super-hero group.

It also makes no difference how Marvel markets him. Coca-Cola marketed their drink as a health food for years, but is it? Drink the drink and read the comics, then get back to me.
Logged
Great Rao
Administrator
Council of Wisdom
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1900



WWW
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2007, 09:18:16 PM »

It really depends on your definition of Superhero.  From The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004:

"A figure, especially in a comic strip or cartoon, endowed with superhuman powers and usually portrayed as fighting evil or crime."

I haven't read enough Wolverine stories to know whether or not he fights any evil or any crime.
Logged

"The bottom line involves choices.  Neither gods nor humans have ever stood calmly in a minefield forever.  Good or evil, they are bound to choose.  And when they do, you will see the truth of all that motivates us.  As a thinking being, you have the obligation to choose.  If the fate of all mankind were in your hands, what would your decision be?  As a writer and an artist, I've drawn my answer."   - Jack Kirby
Super Monkey
Super
League of Supermen
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3435



WWW
« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2007, 11:40:16 PM »

Turns out his name isn't even really Logan!

I am not a fan of him or the X-Men for that matter, I never did like them or Spiderman! LOL, it's true. I will be willing to say that since you have read far more books with that property than I, that I suppose that he could be look upon as a hero in some fan's eyes.


Logged

"I loved Super-Monkey; always wanted to do something with him but it never happened."
- Elliot S! Maggin
Aldous
Superman Squad
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 843


Downunder


« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2007, 11:58:18 PM »

It really depends on your definition of Superhero.  From The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004:

"A figure, especially in a comic strip or cartoon, endowed with superhuman powers and usually portrayed as fighting evil or crime."

I haven't read enough Wolverine stories to know whether or not he fights any evil or any crime.

In addition, one of the main things to look for (that you can hardly miss) is the costume (eg. Superman, Batman, etc.) or the uniform (eg. Fantastic Four, X-Men). Any of the elements alone are not enough. It's not an exact science, is it, but you can see that Steve Austin and Gemini Man are not super-heroes, but other characters with the same abilities (ie. cyborg strength and invisibility respectively) are super-heroes, maybe because of the costumes and other elements that add up to something more than "secret agent".
Logged
Aldous
Superman Squad
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 843


Downunder


« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2007, 12:12:10 AM »

Turns out his name isn't even really Logan!

Well, no, I don't suppose it is. Although, I will always think of him as Logan.

I was a big fan of the character when I collected "Uncanny X-Men". I never liked him solo. I didn't even like the '82 miniseries -- mainly because I hated the art, admittedly. Since the 90s ushered in X-Everything, and all the solo Wolvie stuff -- gah... I have my "Uncanny" collection wherein he was at his best.

I actually stopped buying Marvel cold at the start of the 90s when they brought out the X-Men 1 comic with four or five different covers on the stand. In fact, I stopped buying new comics altogether. I found it almost impossible to find a good comic amongst all the collectors' editions, number ones, and must-haves.

Logged
TELLE
Supermanica Council
Council of Wisdom
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1705



WWW
« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2007, 02:44:38 AM »

This is always fascinating to me: what defines a superhero?

Talking points: Peter Coogan's new book Superhero, secret Origin of a Genre makes a few interesting assertions.

A. Coogan distinguishes between superheroes (ie, Superman) and "heroes who are super" (Gilgamesh).

B. All superheroes must have the following 3 elements:

1. Prosocial Mission

2. SuperPowers - abilities beyond those of ordinary humans

3. Identity - a costume and codename

Wolvie, in his various incarnations, conforms to all 3.  The one that we might quibble about is #1 but the character has acted selflessly in many comics and worked for the greater good as an x-men, etc.  The fact that he kills people (like early Superman?) is not something that really affects the definition.  He doesn't always wear a costume but it is still there (is Superman not a superhero when he save someone with his superbreath while working as Clark Kent?).  The Wolvie of the movies qualifies, at least.

My own definition might even leave out #1 by which I mean, if it looks like a superhero it is a superhero.  And some great superheroes in my opinion, have no powers (and I don't mean Batman-types --more like Uncle Marvel).






« Last Edit: January 17, 2007, 02:47:19 AM by TELLE » Logged

Everything you ever wanted to
know about the classic Superman:
Supermanica
The Encyclopedia of Supermanic Biography!
(temporarily offline)
Aldous
Superman Squad
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 843


Downunder


« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2007, 04:21:38 AM »

This is always fascinating to me: what defines a superhero?

Talking points: Peter Coogan's new book Superhero, secret Origin of a Genre makes a few interesting assertions.

A. Coogan distinguishes between superheroes (ie, Superman) and "heroes who are super" (Gilgamesh).

B. All superheroes must have the following 3 elements:

1. Prosocial Mission

2. SuperPowers - abilities beyond those of ordinary humans

3. Identity - a costume and codename

Wolvie, in his various incarnations, conforms to all 3.  The one that we might quibble about is #1 but the character has acted selflessly in many comics and worked for the greater good as an x-men, etc.  The fact that he kills people (like early Superman?) is not something that really affects the definition.  He doesn't always wear a costume but it is still there (is Superman not a superhero when he save someone with his superbreath while working as Clark Kent?).  The Wolvie of the movies qualifies, at least.

My own definition might even leave out #1 by which I mean, if it looks like a superhero it is a superhero.  And some great superheroes in my opinion, have no powers (and I don't mean Batman-types --more like Uncle Marvel).

Maybe 2. SuperPowers - abilities beyond those of ordinary humans should read 2. Abilities beyond those of ordinary humans because there are so many super-types without super powers. Is Blackhawk a super-hero? Seems like it, but you can't be sure. Is Batman? Yes -- but he hasn't any super powers. 

I might keep # 1 and leave out # 2.

I agree it's fascinating. Characters like The Punisher are a problem too. It's only a feeling, but I wouldn't be able to put my finger on why he isn't a super-hero. Super Monkey's aversion to killing doesn't help, because a few of the Golden Age greats were killers, eg. Hangman, and this is in the heyday of the super-hero. The fact Logan kills is not hard to swallow... What other purpose could those claws possibly serve? They're for killing. That doesn't change his mission statement.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

CURRENT FORUM

Archives: OLD FORUM  -  DCMB  -  KAL-L
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS! Dilber MC Theme by HarzeM
Entrance ·  Origin ·  K-Metal ·  The Living Legend ·  About the Comics ·  Novels ·  Encyclopaedia ·  The Screen ·  Costumes ·  Read Comics Online ·  Trophy Room ·  Creators ·  ES!M ·  Fans ·  Multimedia ·  Community ·  Gift Shop ·  Guest Book ·  Contact & Credits ·  Links ·  Social Media ·  Forum

Superman created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster
The LIVING LEGENDS of SUPERMAN! Adventures of Superman Volume 1!
Return to SUPERMAN THROUGH THE AGES!
Buy Comics!